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Located in Washington, D.C., just four blocks from the U.S. Capitol, Friends Place is an ideal location for school, church, or community groups bringing young people to Washington D.C., on trips to promote civic engagement.

Students conversing outside U.S. Captiol

The historic house, dating to 1917, was extensively repaired and upgraded in 2021 to create a first floor conference space equipped for remote meetings, a second floor meeting room that adjoins a dining room/kitchen area; and seven sleeping rooms that can accommodate up to 29 guests overnight.

Friends Place also offers experiential programs in civic engagement designed for young people to learn and engage in solutions to our country’s structural problems—like racism, militarism, inequity, and injustice—that prevent the full realization of our democracy. Friends Place’s programs are based on the ethical and moral grounding of Quakers (Religious Society of Friends) and are open to all groups.

Students in conversation

Friends Place on Capitol Hill is an independent 501(c)(3) charitable nonprofit subsidiary of the FCNL Education Fund and affiliated with Friends Committee on National Legislation. These are Quaker nonprofit and nonpartisan organizations working together to advance peace, justice, and environmental stewardship.

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Financials and Reports

Friends Place on Capitol Hill is an independent 501(c)(3) charitable nonprofit. It was formerly known as William Penn House. Friends Place is affiliated with the FCNL Education Fund and the Friends Committee on National Legislation, both nonpartisan nonprofit Quaker organizations.

Employer Identification Number: 52‐0846718

For more information on financials, please contact: Thomas Swindell, 800-630-1330 x 2535.

Indigenous Land Acknowledgement

As Friends Place bears witness and promotes civic engagement, it also acknowledges the Nacotchtank tribe on whose ancestral land the Friends Place on Capitol Hill building stands. They are also known as the Anacostans, the Indigenous people who lived along the banks of the Anacostia River, including in several villages in what is now known as Capitol Hill and Washington, D.C. By the 1700s, the Nacotchtank tribe had merged with other tribes like the Pamunkey and the Piscataway, both of which still exist today.